Where It All Got Started: Monteverdi's 'Orfeo'

ENSEMBLE LA FENICE FESTIVAL DE TORROELLA DE MONGRI 2015Is it possible for one person to invent an entire form of art?  It would seem like a tall order, by any standard. 

For example, there is cave art as old as 30,000 years -- the earliest paintings ever discovered.   But it would but hard to claim that the artists who created them actually invented painting.  Surely there were earlier painters whose work simply hasn't survived.

What about music?  Courses on the history of western music often start with Gregorian chant -- or even earlier, with the "Delphic Hymns" from ancient Greece.  But those are just the earliest examples of music that was written down and preserved, not the earliest music ever created.

Still, there is one composer, Claudio Monteverdi, who sometimes gets credit for inventing opera -- which just may be an art form entirely unto itself.  Opera is more than just music combined with storytelling.  It's also stagecraft, poetry and even philosophy -- all rolled into one, unique form of artistic expression. But, could Monteverdi really have invented it?

Technically, the answer is no.  Opera evolved amidst a community of Italian artists in the last years of the 16th century.  But nearly all of their earliest works have been lost.  The ones that are still around aren’t very satisfying, and they’re almost never performed.  That is, until you get to Monteverdi's Orfeo, in 1607. 

With Orfeo, Monteverdi created the first opera that both survived the centuries and stuck in the repertory.  It's the earliest example of opera’s uncanny ability to present the straightforward words of its characters, along with their anguished and chaotic emotions -- and to express all this simultaneously, with the remarkable clarity and insight that are the trademarks of any great opera.  You might call it the first opera that actually "works," and it's still working in opera houses all over the world, 400 years after Monteverdi wrote it.

On World of Opera, host Lisa Simeone brings us Monteverdi's Orfeo -- arguably the single work from which all other operas are descended -- in a production from the Toroella de Montgri Music Festival, on the Costa Brava in Spain.  Jean Tubéry leads the Ensemble La Fenice, with tenor Jan Van Elsacker in the title role and soprano Caroline Tarrit as Euridice.